Category Archives: Arizona

2018 MINIMUM WAGE CHECK-UP

With various cities and counties having enacted local minimum wages and 18 states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York*, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington) are increasing their own minimum wages on January 1st (December 31st for New York), employers should take time to verify that they are meeting the minimum wage requirements of their state/city/county.

The below chart sets forth the minimum wage effective January 1, 2018.

employer PAYS $1.50/hr towards medical benefits$11.91

Federal $7.25
State City/County  Amount?
Alabama  $7.25
Alaska*  $9.84
Arizona* — all cities/counties except …  $10.50
Flagstaff* $11.00
Arkansas  $8.50
California* — all cities/counties except …                                  small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $11.00
Berkeley  $13.75
Cupertino* $13.50
El Cerrito*  $13.60
Emeryville                                           small employer (55 or less) $14.00
large employer (56 or more) $15.20
Los Altos* $13.50
Los Angeles                                         small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Malibu                                                  small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Milpitas* $12.00
Mountain View* $15.00
Oakland $12.86
Palo Alto* $13.50
Pasadena                                             small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Richmond*                                             employer does NOT pay $1.50/hr towards medical benefits $13.41
employer PAYS $1.50/hr towards medical benefits $11.91
Sacramento*                                      small employer (100 or less) $10.50
large employer (101 or more) $11.00
San Diego $11.50
San Francisco $14.00
San Jose* $13.50
San Leandro $13.00
San Mateo*                                                 For-profit organizations $13.50
Non-profit organizations $12.00
Santa Clara* $13.00
Santa Monica                                       small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Sunnyvale* $15.00
Los Angeles County                            small employer (25 or less)

unincorporated areas                            large employer (26 or more)

$10.50

$12.00

Colorado* $10.20
Connecticut $10.10
Delaware $8.25
Florida* $8.25
Georgia $7.25
Hawaii* $10.10
Idaho $7.25
Illinois — all cities/counties except … $8.25
Chicago $11.00
Cook County

(except for the Village of Barrington)

$10.00
Indiana $7.25
Iowa $7.25
Kansas $7.25
Kentucky $7.25
Louisiana $7.25
Maine* — all cities/counties except … $10.00
Portland $10.68
Maryland — all cities/counties except … $9.25
Montgomery County $11.50
Prince George’s County $11.50
Massachusetts $11.00
Michigan* $9.25
Minnesota* — all cities/counties except … “small employers” (employers with an annual sales volume of less than $500,000) $7.87
“large employers” (employers with an annual sales volume of $500,000+) $9.65
Minneapolis                                         large employer (101 or more) $10.00
Mississippi $7.25
Missouri $7.85
Montana* $8.30
Nebraska $9.00
Nevada $8.25
New Hampshire $7.25
New Jersey* $8.60
New Mexico — all cities/counties except … $7.50
Albuquerque*                                             employer provides benefits $7.95
employer does NOT provide benefits $8.95
Las Cruces* $9.45
Santa Fe $11.09
Bernalillo County*unincorporated areas                                             employer provides benefits $7.85
employer does NOT provide benefits $8.85
Santa Fe County unincorporated areas $11.09
New York**  “Upstate” employers (excluding fast food employees) $10.40
“Downstate” employers (excluding fast food employees) $11.00
“Small” NYC employers (excluding fast food employees $12.00
Fast food employees outside NYC $11.75
“Large” NYC employers (excluding fast food employees) $13.00
Fast food employees inside NYC $13.50
North Carolina $7.25
North Dakota $7.25
Ohio* $8.30
Oklahoma $7.25
Oregon — all cities/counties except … $10.25
Portland $11.25
Nonurban Counties 

(Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klmath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa Wheeler counties)

$10.00
Pennsylvania $7.25
Rhode Island* $10.10
South Carolina $7.25
South Dakota* $8.85
Tennessee $7.25
Texas $7.25
Utah $7.25
Vermont* $10.50
Virginia $7.25
Washington* — all cities/counties except … $11.50
City of SeaTac* (hospitality and transportation workers) $15.64
Seattle* $14.00
small employer who does not pay towards medical benefits

(500 or less)

small employer who does pay towards medical benefits

(500 or less)

$11.50
large employer who does not pay towards medical benefits

(501 or more)

$15.00
large employer who does pay towards medical benefits

(501 or more)

$15.45
Tacoma* $12.00
Washington DC $12.50
West Virginia $8.75
Wisconsin $7.25
Wyoming $7.25
 * = increase in minimum wage effective January 1, 2018

** = increase in minimum wage effective December 31, 2017

 

Caveat: Please be advised that this information is being provided as a courtesy and that ePlace Solutions, Inc. does not track local laws and ordinances and will not update this information with changes in local laws and ordinances.

 

 

REMINDER – Pay Attention To Local Minimum Wage Laws

It’s a wage and hour obligation that’s familiar to all employers – the requirement to pay employees at least minimum wage for every hour worked.  It seems like a pretty simple obligation to meet, right?  Not necessarily.  With different state minimum wages and numerous localities passing local minimum wages, mistakes are easy to make and can be quite costly – as two rental car companies recently learned.

What happened?

Washington State Employees of two nationwide rental car companies (Hertz and Thrifty) filed a class action lawsuit against their employer claiming that the employers failed to pay the employees’ at least minimum wage in accordance with the minimum wage ordinance in SeaTac, Washington, which increased the minimum wage for Hospitality and Transportation employees in SeaTac to $15.00 per hour in 2015 (and adjusts the minimum wage for inflation in subsequent years).

This lawsuit was recently settled for $2 million dollars.

Why Do I Care?

As of July 2017, over 30 localities* have adopted local minimum wages above their state minimum wage. If you have operations in any of these localities, then you are required to pay all employees at least the local minimum wage.  It is recommended that you check the minimum wage in your locality and verify that you are in compliance with any local ordinance relating to minimum wage.

———————–

* Localities with local minimum wage:

  • Arizona: Flagstaff.
  • California: Berkeley, Cupertino, El Cerrito, Emeryville, Los Altos, Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, Malibu, Milpitas, Mountain View, Oakland, Palo Alto, Pasadena, Richmond, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, San Leandro, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Monica, and Sunnyvale.
  • Illinois: Chicago and Cook County.
  • Maine: Portland.
  • Maryland: Montgomery County and Prince George’s County.
  • New Mexico: Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, Las Cruces, Santa Fe City, and Santa Fe County.
  • New York : New York City, Nassau County, Suffolk County, and Westchester County
  • Oregon: Portland Urban Growth Boundary.
  • Washington: SeaTac, Seattle, and Tacoma.

Industrial Commission of Arizona Issues Additional Paid Sick Leave FAQs

On June 30, 2017, the Industrial Commission of Arizona (ICA) issued new frequently asked questions (FAQs) relating to Arizona’s new paid sick leave law.

While some of the new FAQs simply restate the draft regulations, others provide useful examples illustrating how employers can comply with the new laws. These include examples of how to calculate “same hourly rate” for various employee groups.

In addition, the new FAQs clarify the following points relating to paid sick leave (among others):

  • Pre-7/1/17 Paid Leave Accrual — Paid leave accrued prior to July 1, 2017 does not count towards an employee’s Arizona paid sick leave accrual.
  • On-Call Employees — Employers may restrict on-call employees’ use of earned paid sick time to:
    • “periods of time in which the on-call employee is scheduled to work” or
    • “periods of time that the on-call employee would be scheduled to work but for circumstances justifying use of earned paid sick time.”
  • Rehires – If an employee is rehired within 9 months of termination, but the employer voluntarily paid out the employee’s accrued, unused paid sick leave at termination, then the employer is not required to reinstate paid sick leave.
  • No Notice = No PSL – If an employee does not follow the employer’s written policy relating to providing notice for paid sick leave use, then the employer may refuse to designate time as PSL if the employee fails to comply with the written notice requirements.

Recommendation

Arizona employers should review their policies and practices and verify they comply with the draft regulations and the ICA FAQs interpreting the paid sick leave law.

New Laws Effective July 2017

Labor Laws in the Workplace as Concept

Aside from the minimum wage increases, there are a number of new laws coming into effect in July 2017. While many of these have been addressed in detail in previous articles, the following is a summary of the new laws/regulations that may be going into effect in your state …

State New Law
Arizona House Bill 2322 — For purposes of the state’s labor and employment laws, a franchisor is not an employer or co-employer of either a franchisee or an employee of the franchisee, unless the franchisor agrees, in writing, to assume that role. Effective July 6, 2017
Proposition 206 (Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act) — Arizona workers accrue and have the legal right to use a minimum amount of paid sick time each year. Effective July 1, 2017
California Applicant/Employee Criminal History Regulations – New regulations relating to when an employer can (and cannot) use an applicant’s or employee’s criminal history in hiring and other employment decisions. Effective July 1, 2017
Transgender Identity and Expression Regulations — New regulations relating to the rights of transgender employees in the workplace, how to resolve certain situations associated with transgender employees. Employers are also required to respect the names, genders, and pronouns preferred by employees for identification purposes and cannot require individuals to provide documentation of sex, gender, gender identity, or gender expression as a condition of employment. Effective July 1, 2017
New Workplace Notices for Barbering and Cosmetology Establishments – This notice must be posted in the workplace. Available in English, Spanish, Korean, Vietnamese. Effective July 1, 2017
New Domestic Violence Workplace Notice – Employers with 25+ employees must provide employees with this notice or (for existing employees) upon request. Available in English and Spanish. Effective July 1, 2017
Florida Senate Bill 370 (Civil Air Patrol Leave) — Employers with 15+ employees must provide up to 15 days of unpaid Civil Air Patrol Leave to eligible employees. Effective July 1, 2017
Georgia Senate Bill 201 (“Family Caregiver” Leave) — Employers with 25+ employees who provide sick leave benefits (i.e. sick leave or PTO) must allow their employees to use up to five days of these benefits per year “to care for an immediate family member.” Effective July 1, 2017
House Bill 243 — Georgia localities (i.e. cities, counties, municipalities, etc.) cannot require employers to pay employees “predictive pay” (e.g. to compensate employees for changes to an employee’s schedule). Effective July 1, 2017
Indiana Senate Bill 312 – Indiana localities (i.e. cities, counties, municipalities, etc.) cannot bar employers from inquiring about criminal history at the time of initial employment or requiring the candidate to disclose such information. Effective July 1, 2017
Iowa Senate File 444 – Using a handheld electronic communication device to write, read, or send an electronic message, including texts or social media posts, while driving is prohibited. Effective July 1, 2017
Senate File 32 – Use of hair samples for pre-employment workplace drug-testing is permissible. Effective July 1, 2017
Montana Senate Bill 326 — Employer cannot inquire or consider about an applicant’s criminal history until after a conditional offer of employment has been made. In addition, unless a criminal background check of an applicant is required for a license or otherwise prior to hiring for employment, an employer cannot disqualify an applicant solely or in part because of a prior conviction unless certain criteria are met. Effective July 1, 2017
Nevada Assembly Bill 113 — Employers must provide reasonable unpaid break time for covered employees (breastfeeding employees with children under one year of age) to express breast milk as needed. Effective July 1, 2017
New Hampshire House Bill 194 – Employers are required to pay all wages due to employees at regular intervals not to exceed 14 days. (previously it was within eight days following the week in which the work was performed.) Effective July 11, 2017
New York New York Paid Family Leave Benefits Law – Employers may start collecting the weekly employee contribution for paid family leave. (Employees cannot start using this leave until January 1, 2018) Effective July 1, 2017
South Dakota Senate Bill 137 — A franchisee or an employee of a franchisee is not considered an employee of the franchisor Effective July 1, 2017
Vermont Senate Bill 69 — Employers are required to make child support payments directly to the appropriate out-of-state agency upon receipt of a Court order. Effective July 1, 2017
House Bill 261 — Employers cannot ask questions about criminal history on job applications (except under limited circumstances). Criminal history inquiries can only be made during an interview or once the applicant has been deemed otherwise qualified for the position.   If a candidate with a criminal history is eligible for the job, that individual must be given the opportunity to explain that history, including any post-conviction rehabilitation. Effective July 1, 2017
Senate Bill 16 – Authorized medical marijuana users expanded to include persons suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, Parkinson’s disease, and Crohn’s disease Effective July 1, 2017
Washington Senate Bill 5289 (Distract Driving Law) – Individuals are banned from “using” (e.g. holding in either or both hands; using a hand of finger to compose, send, browse, access or retrieve messages or other data; or watching a video) cell phones and related devices while driving. Effective July 1, 2017
Senate Bill 5835 – Employers with 15+ employees must provide reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers unless doing so would impose an undue hardship. Employers also cannot discriminate and retaliate against employees who request, decline, or use any such accommodation. Effective July 23, 2017
West Virginia Senate Bill 76 – Employers receive limited civil immunity for hiring convicted felons and persons in reduced misdemeanor status. Effective July 8, 2017
House Bill 2857 (West Virginia Safer Workplace Act) – Clarifies that drug/alcohol testing prospective and current employees is legal and makes it easier for employers to conduct drug and alcohol testing without violating the law. Effective July 1, 2017
Senate Bill 386 (West Virginia Medical Cannabis Act) — Legalizes medical marijuana use for persons with a qualifying medical condition and protects employees from discrimination based on their certification for medical marijuana use. However, employers are not be required to make any accommodations for the use of medical marijuana at the workplace. Effective July 6, 2017
Wyoming Senate File 94 — Franchisors are only considered employers of either a franchisee or a franchisee’s employees if agreed to in writing by the franchisor and franchisee. Effective July 1, 2017

Arizona Employers – Are You Prepared For The New Paid Sick Time Law?

On July 1, 2017, the paid sick time portion of the Arizona Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act (Proposition 206) goes into effect.

Under this law, all Arizona employers are required to provide employees with paid sick time as follows:

  • Employers with less than 15 employees (“Small Employers”): Employees are entitled to accrue 24 hours of earned paid sick time per year
  • Employers with 15 or more employees (“Large Employers”): Employees are entitled to accrue 40 hours of earned paid sick time per year.

Paid sick time may be provided to employees on an “up front” or “accrual” basis.

If an employer chooses to advance (“up front”) the earned sick leave, employers must makes the full amount of sick leave for the year (24 hours for small employers and 40 hours for large employers).

If employers choose to use the accrual method, then employees must accrue a minimum of one (1) hour of paid sick time for every thirty (40) hours worked up to a maximum of twenty-four (24) hours (small employers) or forty (40) hours (large employers) in a calendar year.

Regardless of the method used, employees must be allowed to “carry over” unused, accrued paid sick time as follows:

  • Small Employers: Employees are entitled to carry over 24 hours of accrued, unused paid sick time per year
  • Large Employers: Employees are entitled to carry over 40 hours of accrued, unused paid sick time per year.

The carry over of unused, accrued paid sick time does not prevent the employee from accruing the full annual accrual in the following year; however, employers are still only required to allow an employee to use 24 hours (small employers) or 40 hours (large employers) of paid sick time per year.

Alternatively, in lieu of carry over, an employer may elect to pay an employee for unused earned paid sick time.

An employee becomes eligible to use paid sick time when he/she has on the 90th calendar day after his/her first day of employment. At that point, the employee is eligible to use any available paid sick time in his/her bank

An employee may use his/her accrued paid sick time for the following purposes:

  • An employee’s mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; an employee’s need for medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; an employee’s need for preventive medical care;
  • Care of a family member with a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; care of a family member who needs medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; care of a family member who needs preventive medical care;
  • Closure of the employee’s place of business by order of a public official due to a public health emergency or an employee’s need to care for a child whose school or place of care has been closed by order of a public official due to a public health emergency, or care for oneself or a family member when it has been determined by the health authorities having jurisdiction or by a health care provider that the employee’s or family member’s presence in the community may jeopardize the health of others because of his or her exposure to a communicable disease, whether or not the employee or family member has actually contracted the communicable disease; or
  • Absence necessary due to domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse or stalking, provided the leave is to allow the employee to obtain for the employee or the employee’s family member:
    • Medical attention needed to recover from physical or psychological injury or disability caused by domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse or stalking;
    • Services from a domestic violence or sexual violence program or victim services organization;
    • Psychological or other counseling;
    • Relocation or taking steps to secure an existing home due to the domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse or stalking; or
    • Legal services, including but not limited to preparing for or participating in any civil or criminal legal proceeding related to or resulting from the domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse or stalking.

The Arizona Earned Paid Sick Time Poster must be displayed where employees can easily read it. The poster is available in both English and Spanish.

Take Home For Employers

The Industrial Commission of Arizona has published Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Minimum Wage and Earned Paid Sick Time to help employers understand this new law. It is recommended that all Arizona review these FAQs.

Proposed Regulations for Arizona Paid sick leave published

On May 5, 2017, the Industrial Commission of Arizona (ICA) released its draft regulations relating to the new Arizona paid sick leave law (see pages 19-24), which goes into effect on July 1, 2017.

These proposed regulations are not finalized and are subject to public comment through June 5, 2017. It is recommended that Arizona employers review the proposed rules and submit any comments relating thereto prior to the June 5, 2017 deadline.

A hearing regarding the proposed regulations is scheduled for June 5, 2017, at 9:00 a.m., in the auditorium of the Industrial Commission of Arizona, 800 West Washington, Phoenix, Arizona 85007.

The Fate of Arizona’s Proposition 206 Has Been Decided

In its March 14, 2017 order, the Arizona Supreme Court unanimously ruled to uphold Proposition 206, the November 2016 ballot initiative that increases the Arizona minimum wage and requires employers in the state to offer paid sick leave to employees.

The constitutionality of the ballot measure was challenged by a group of business organizations in December 2016 on two separate grounds.

These groups argued that the ballot measure violated the “Separate Amendment Rule,” which mandates that any proposed amendment to the Arizona constitution be limited to related matters of substance. The groups claimed that Proposition 206 was unconstitutional because it addressed the two distinctly unrelated subjects of minimum wage and paid sick leave.

The groups also argued that the ballot measure would create new costs to the state because even though the minimum wage requirements do not apply to state employers, private vendors to the state were subject to the new minimum wage requirements, which would, in turn, increase costs to the state. Such increased costs without providing a new revenue source are also unconstitutional.

The Arizona Supreme Court was not swayed by either of these arguments and instead upheld Proposition 206.

Impact on Arizona employers

In December of 2016, these same business groups requested the court delay the implementation of the new minimum wage until this lawsuit was resolved. That request was denied later that month and the new minimum wage went into effect on January 1, 2017. As a result, all Arizona employers should be in compliance with the new minimum wage.

The greater impact is the new paid sick leave law. Some Arizona employers may have delaying developing a paid sick leave policy until this lawsuit was resolved. With the Arizona Supreme Court’s ruling, the Arizona paid sick leave law will be going into effect on July 1, 2017. Therefore, all Arizona employers should take steps to ensure they are prepared for the new paid sick leave law.

Finally, the Industrial Commission of Arizona has issued a series of Frequently Asked Questions (“FAQs”) regarding Prop 206’s requirements. It is recommended that all Arizona employers review these FAQs.

New FAQs on Arizona’s new minimum wage and paid sick leave law

The Industrial Commission of Arizona (ICA) recently released its initial Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Minimum Wage and Earned Paid Sick Time. This document is intended to provide guidance regarding the new Arizona minimum wage and the paid sick time (PST) provisions.

While this new document answers some commonly asked questions on these new laws, among the important issues addressed is the release of the model notices that the ICA is supposed to prepared. These are the notices that Arizona employers will be required to post in order to stay in compliance with the new law. According to the FAQs, these notices are still “currently being developed.”

Arizona’s new minimum wage and paid sick leave law faces legal challenges

Despite its victory at the polls (with 58% of votes cast in favor of the measure), Arizona’s Proposition 206, the minimum wage and paid sick time referendum, is facing legal challenges from numerous parties, including the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry and a number of local chambers of commerce.

On December 15, 2016, a lawsuit was filed in Arizona’s Maricopa County Superior Court challenging the legality of Arizona’s Proposition 206. In short, the lawsuit claims that Proposition 206 violates the Arizona constitution on two grounds.

To start, the proponents of the lawsuit were seeking a preliminary injunction, which would prevent Proposition 206 from going into effect on January 1, 2017. The hearing on the preliminary injunction was scheduled for the next day (December 16th), but the preliminary injunction was denied because, according to Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Daniel Kiley (the judge assigned to the case) it wouldn’t be fair to temporarily halt the increase since the lawsuit had been filed the previous day. Instead, the judge set a hearing for this week to consider the lawsuit.

For now, Arizona employers should continue to prepare for the new minimum wage, but not make any changes until closer to the end of the year or, if the Court issues a ruling before then, after the Court issues its ruling. We will keep employers informed of any changes.

Arizona Employers – Coming July 1, 2017 To A Workplace Near You – Paid Sick Leave

In addition to increasing Arizona’s minimum wage starting January 1, 2017 (see 2016 Election Aftermath – Minimum wage to increase in Arizona, Colorado, Maine, and Washington), the passage of Proposition 206 also brings paid sick leave to Arizona employers.

Starting July 1, 2017, all Arizona employers will be required to start providing employees with paid sick leave. With the passage of Proposition 206, Arizona joins Oregon, California, Washington, Massachusetts, Vermont, and Connecticut as states that provide paid sick leave to employees. (Washington DC and numerous cities in the US also require employers to provide paid sick leave benefits).

Who is covered by the Arizona Paid Sick Leave Law?

Virtually all Arizona employers will be required to provide employees with paid sick leave. However, the amount of paid sick leave that must be provided depends on the number of employees the employer employs.

The only employers who are exempt from the new paid sick leave requirements are qualifying “small businesses.” To qualify as a “small business,” a business must have gross annual revenues of less than $500,000 and not be engaged in interstate commerce or in the production of goods for interstate commerce.

How much paid sick leave must be provided?

Starting July 1, 2017, employees of Arizona employers will start accruing paid sick leave. Paid sick leave benefits will accrue at a rate of 1 hour for every 30 hours worked by the employee. For new employees, accrual begins on the first day of employment.

For employees of large employers (15 or more employees), employers must provide at least 40 hours of paid sick leave per year; while small employers (less than 15 employees) are only required to provide at least 24 hours of paid sick leave per year.

When are employees eligible to use paid sick leave?

The new sick leave law imposes a 90-calendar day waiting period before a newly hired employee can use paid sick leave benefits. This means that for employees who have been employed by the employer for more than 90 days as of July 1, 2017, those employees will be eligible to use their paid sick leave benefits as those benefits are accrued.

What can paid sick leave be used for?

Under the new law, an employee will be able to use his/her paid sick leave benefits for the following purposes:

  • an employee’s illness, injury, or health condition, including diagnosis, treatment, care, and preventive care;
  • to care for a family member’s illness, injury, or health condition, including diagnosis, treatment, care, and preventive care;
  • when an employee’s place of business or an employee’s child’s school or place of care is closed by a public health official for any health-related reason; or,
  • for employee absences for qualified leave under the domestic violence leave act.

What are the employee’s notice requirements before using paid sick leave?

An employer may require employees to give reasonable notice of an absence from work, so long for an unforeseeable absence, the employer provides employees with a written policy that contains the procedures an employee must follow to provide notice of his/her need for paid sick leave. In addition, for absences exceeding three days, an employer may require verification that an employee’s use of paid sick leave is for an authorized purpose. If an employer requires verification, verification must be provided to the employer within a reasonable time period during or after the leave.

What are the employer’s notice requirements relating to paid sick leave?

An employer must give employees written notice of their right to paid sick leave. This notice must be provided by July 1, 2017 (to those employees hired before July 1 2017) or at the commencement of employment (for those employees hired on or after July 1, 2017). The Industrial Commission of Arizona is required to develop a model notice before the law goes into effect.

What should Arizona employers do to prepare for the new law?

Arizona’s new Paid Sick Leave Law goes into effect on July 1, 2017. Before that time, the Industrial Commission of Arizona is required to develop regulations regarding the new paid sick leave law. In order to prepare for this new law, employers should prepare paid sick leave policies and plan to include those policies in their 2017 Employee Handbook. In addition, employers with existing sick leave or PTO policies should check their policies to verify that they are compliant with this new law. We will keep you posted about this law as it draws closer to the effective date.