Tag Archives: Alaska

Is The Minimum Required Salary For Exempt Employees Increasing In Your State In 2019?

While the FLSA minimum salary requirements for “white collar” employees (executive, administrative, or professional employees) is not changing in 2019 (at least not until/unless the Department of Labor announces a new Overtime Rule), there are several states where the minimum salary requirements for exempt employees is increasing in 2019 (December 31, 2018 for New York employers).

These increases (i.e. in Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, New York, and Oregon) are occurring because the minimum exempt salary rates for these employees (as established under state law) are scheduled to increase in 2018 (December 31st for New York employers).

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the minimum salary requirements for white collar employees is as follows:

Payment Schedule Minimum Salary
Weekly $455
Bi-Weekly $910
Semi-Monthly $985.83
Monthly $1,971.66
Annual $23,660

The below table sets forth the changes to the minimum salary requirements for exempt employees in these states.  In those instances where the state minimum salary requirements are lower than the above-listed FLSA requirements, the higher salary threshold applies for employers who are subject to FLSA in order for employees to qualify for an exemption under the FLSA.

Alaska
Applicable Law: An individual employed in a bona fide executive, administrative, or professional capacity shall be compensated on a salary or fee basis at a rate of not less than two times the state minimum wage for the first 40 hours of employment each week, exclusive of board or lodging that is furnished by the individual’s employer. Alaska Stat. § 23.10.055(b).

 Since Alaska’s minimum wage is increasing to $9.89 per hour starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees is increasing as follows:

Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $787.20 $791.20
Bi-Weekly $1,574.40 $1,582.40
Semi-Monthly $1,705.60 $1,714.27
Monthly $3,411.20 $3,428.53
Annual $40,768 $41,142.40
California
Applicable Law: Overtime-exempt executive, administrative and professional employees must earn a monthly salary equivalent to at least two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment. IWC Wage Orders.

 Since California’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.00 per hour (for employers with 25 or less employees) and $12.00 per hour (for employers with 26 or more employees) starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees is increasing as follows:

Small Employers (25 or less employees)
Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $840 $880
Bi-Weekly $1,680 $1,760
Semi-Monthly $1,820 $1,906.67
Monthly $3,640 $3, 813.34
Annual $43,680 $45,760
Large Employers (26 or more employees)
Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $880 $960
Bi-Weekly $1,760 $1,920
Semi-Monthly $1,906.67 $2,080
Monthly $3,813.34 $4,160
Annual $45,760 $49,920
Colorado**
Applicable Law: Exempt executive/supervisory employees must be a salaried employee earning in excess of the equivalent of the minimum wage for all hours the employee worked in a workweek. Colorado Minimum Wage Order.

Note: The administrative and professional exemptions only require that an employee be a “salaried individual” and does not provide a minimum salary requirement.

 Since Colorado’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.10 per hour starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt executive/supervisory employees is increasing as follows:

Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary* 2019 Minimum Salary*
Weekly $408 $444
Bi-Weekly $816 $888
Semi-Monthly $884 $962
Monthly $1,768 $1,924
Annual $21,216 $23,088
* These numbers are based on the employee working 40 hours per week.  If the employee works more than 40 hours per week, the required pay will be greater.
** In order for an executive employee to meet the minimum salary requirement under the FLSA, the employee will need to be paid the FLSA minimum salary.  However, once that employee works over 41 hours in a week, the state minimum wage salary requirement will apply.
Maine
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is 3,000 times the Maine minimum hourly wage or the minimum salary required by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, whichever is higher. 26 M.R.S 663(3)(K).

 Currently, the state threshold is higher than the FLSA threshold; therefore, the state threshold applies.

Since Maine’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.00 per hour starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees is increasing as follows:

Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $576.92 $634.61
Bi-Weekly $1,153.84 $1, 269.23
Semi-Monthly $1,250 $1,375
Monthly $2,500 $2,750
Annual $30,000 $33,000
New York – INCREASES 12/31/2018
Applicable Law: Exempt executive and administrative employees must be paid at least the minimum salary set forth in the applicable New York Wage Orders.

 Note: There is no salary basis test for professional employees under New York law.

Under the amendments to the New York Wage Orders, the minimum salary for exempt executive and administrative employees is increasing on December 31, 2018 as follows:

New York City (11 or More Employees)
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $975 $1,125
Bi-Weekly $1,950 $2,250
Semi-Monthly $2,112.50 $2,437.50
Monthly $4,225 $4,875
Annual $50,700 $58,500
New York City (10 or Fewer Employees)
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $900 $1,012.50
Bi-Weekly $1,800 $2,025
Semi-Monthly $1,950 $2,193.75
Monthly $3,900 $4,387.50
Annual $46,800 $52,650
Nassau, Suffolk & Westchester Counties
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $825 $900
Bi-Weekly $1,650 $1,800
Semi-Monthly $1,787.50 $1,950
Monthly $3,575 $3,900
Annual $42,900 $46,800
Remainder of State
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $780 $832
Bi-Weekly $1,560 $1,664
Semi-Monthly $1,690 $1,802.67
Monthly $3,380 $3,605.34
Annual $40,560 $43,264
Oregon*  – INCREASES 7/1/2019
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is the applicable minimum wage multiplied by 2,080 hours per year and then divided by 12 months. Or. Rev. Stat. § 653.010(9).

 Since Oregon’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.00 per hour (for employers in “nonurban counties”), $12.50 per hour (for employers in the Portland metropolitan area), and $11.25 per hour (for the remainder of the state) starting July 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees will be increasing as follows:

Nonurban Counties (Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, and Wheeler counties)
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 7/1/19
Weekly $420 $440
Bi-Weekly $840 $880
Semi-Monthly $910 $953.34
Monthly $1,820 $1,906.67
Annual $21,840 $22,880
Portland Metropolitan Area
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 7/1/19
Weekly $450 $500
Bi-Weekly $900 $1,000
Semi-Monthly $975 $1, 083.34
Monthly $1,950 $2, 166.67
Annual $23,400 $26,000
Remainder of the State
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 7/1/19
Weekly $430 $450
Bi-Weekly $860 $900
Semi-Monthly $931.67 $975
Monthly $1,863.33 $1,950
Annual $22,360 $23,400
NOTE:  Currently, only employers in the Portland metropolitan area must pay the state salary in order for to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption.  All other employers in Oregon must pay the FLSA minimum salary in order for to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption.

While not increasing, the minimum salary requirements to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is higher than the FLSA threshold in the following states:

Connecticut
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is $475 per week. Regs., Conn. State Agencies § 31-60-14.
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary
Weekly $475
Bi-Weekly $950
Semi-Monthly $1,029.17
Monthly $2,058.33
Annual $24,700
Iowa
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify as a “high-salaried” executive, professional or administrative employee (and qualify for an exemption from overtime if the duties test is also met) is $500 per week. 875 Iowa Admin. Code 218.1-218.3.
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary
Weekly $500
Bi-Weekly $1,000
Semi-Monthly $1,083.34
Monthly $2,166.67
Annual $26,000

Recommendation for Employers

It is recommended that employers in these states verify that their exempt employees are receiving at least the minimum salary requirement to qualify for the exemption.

Also, please remember that meeting the salary requirement is just one element needed to qualify for an exemption from overtime.  The employee in question must also meet the duties test and the salary basis test.

NEW LAW: Alaska’s Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2019

Alaska employers, mark your calendars.  On January 1, 2019, Alaska’s minimum wage will increase from $9.84 per hour to $9.89 per hour.

Under the Alaska minimum wage law, the Alaska minimum wage must be adjusted on an annual to account for inflation.  This adjustment is made using the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the proceeding January-December calendar year.

Check to See if the Minimum Required Salary For Exempt Employees is Increasing In Your State

While the minimum salary requirements for “white collar” employees (executive, administrative, or professional employees) is not changing in 2018 (at least not until/unless the Department of Labor announces a new Overtime Rule), there are several states where the minimum salary requirements for exempt employees is increasing in 2018 (December 31st for New York employers).

These increases (i.e. in Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, New York, and Oregon) are occurring because the minimum exempt salary rates for these employees (as established under state law) are scheduled to increase in 2018 (December 31st for New York employers).

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the minimum salary requirements for white collar employees is as follows:

Payment Schedule Minimum Salary
Weekly $455
Bi-Weekly $910
Semi-Monthly $985.83
Monthly $1,971.66
Annual $23,660

Continue reading Check to See if the Minimum Required Salary For Exempt Employees is Increasing In Your State

2018 MINIMUM WAGE CHECK-UP

With various cities and counties having enacted local minimum wages and 18 states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York*, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington) are increasing their own minimum wages on January 1st (December 31st for New York), employers should take time to verify that they are meeting the minimum wage requirements of their state/city/county.

The below chart sets forth the minimum wage effective January 1, 2018.

employer PAYS $1.50/hr towards medical benefits$11.91

Federal $7.25
State City/County  Amount?
Alabama  $7.25
Alaska*  $9.84
Arizona* — all cities/counties except …  $10.50
Flagstaff* $11.00
Arkansas  $8.50
California* — all cities/counties except …                                  small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $11.00
Berkeley  $13.75
Cupertino* $13.50
El Cerrito*  $13.60
Emeryville                                           small employer (55 or less) $14.00
large employer (56 or more) $15.20
Los Altos* $13.50
Los Angeles                                         small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Malibu                                                  small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Milpitas* $12.00
Mountain View* $15.00
Oakland $12.86
Palo Alto* $13.50
Pasadena                                             small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Richmond*                                             employer does NOT pay $1.50/hr towards medical benefits $13.41
employer PAYS $1.50/hr towards medical benefits $11.91
Sacramento*                                      small employer (100 or less) $10.50
large employer (101 or more) $11.00
San Diego $11.50
San Francisco $14.00
San Jose* $13.50
San Leandro $13.00
San Mateo*                                                 For-profit organizations $13.50
Non-profit organizations $12.00
Santa Clara* $13.00
Santa Monica                                       small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Sunnyvale* $15.00
Los Angeles County                            small employer (25 or less)

unincorporated areas                            large employer (26 or more)

$10.50

$12.00

Colorado* $10.20
Connecticut $10.10
Delaware $8.25
Florida* $8.25
Georgia $7.25
Hawaii* $10.10
Idaho $7.25
Illinois — all cities/counties except … $8.25
Chicago $11.00
Cook County

(except for the Village of Barrington)

$10.00
Indiana $7.25
Iowa $7.25
Kansas $7.25
Kentucky $7.25
Louisiana $7.25
Maine* — all cities/counties except … $10.00
Portland $10.68
Maryland — all cities/counties except … $9.25
Montgomery County $11.50
Prince George’s County $11.50
Massachusetts $11.00
Michigan* $9.25
Minnesota* — all cities/counties except … “small employers” (employers with an annual sales volume of less than $500,000) $7.87
“large employers” (employers with an annual sales volume of $500,000+) $9.65
Minneapolis                                         large employer (101 or more) $10.00
Mississippi $7.25
Missouri $7.85
Montana* $8.30
Nebraska $9.00
Nevada $8.25
New Hampshire $7.25
New Jersey* $8.60
New Mexico — all cities/counties except … $7.50
Albuquerque*                                             employer provides benefits $7.95
employer does NOT provide benefits $8.95
Las Cruces* $9.45
Santa Fe $11.09
Bernalillo County*unincorporated areas                                             employer provides benefits $7.85
employer does NOT provide benefits $8.85
Santa Fe County unincorporated areas $11.09
New York**  “Upstate” employers (excluding fast food employees) $10.40
“Downstate” employers (excluding fast food employees) $11.00
“Small” NYC employers (excluding fast food employees $12.00
Fast food employees outside NYC $11.75
“Large” NYC employers (excluding fast food employees) $13.00
Fast food employees inside NYC $13.50
North Carolina $7.25
North Dakota $7.25
Ohio* $8.30
Oklahoma $7.25
Oregon — all cities/counties except … $10.25
Portland $11.25
Nonurban Counties 

(Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klmath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa Wheeler counties)

$10.00
Pennsylvania $7.25
Rhode Island* $10.10
South Carolina $7.25
South Dakota* $8.85
Tennessee $7.25
Texas $7.25
Utah $7.25
Vermont* $10.50
Virginia $7.25
Washington* — all cities/counties except … $11.50
City of SeaTac* (hospitality and transportation workers) $15.64
Seattle* $14.00
small employer who does not pay towards medical benefits

(500 or less)

small employer who does pay towards medical benefits

(500 or less)

$11.50
large employer who does not pay towards medical benefits

(501 or more)

$15.00
large employer who does pay towards medical benefits

(501 or more)

$15.45
Tacoma* $12.00
Washington DC $12.50
West Virginia $8.75
Wisconsin $7.25
Wyoming $7.25
 * = increase in minimum wage effective January 1, 2018

** = increase in minimum wage effective December 31, 2017

 

Caveat: Please be advised that this information is being provided as a courtesy and that ePlace Solutions, Inc. does not track local laws and ordinances and will not update this information with changes in local laws and ordinances.

 

 

NEW LAW: Alaska’s Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2018

Alaska employers, mark your calendars.  On January 1, 2018, Alaska’s minimum wage will increase from $9.80 per hour to $9.84 per hour.

Under the Alaska minimum wage law, the Alaska minimum wage must be adjusted on an annual to account for inflation.  This adjustment is made using the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the proceeding January-December calendar year.

Alaska’s Minimum Wage to Increase January 1, 2017

Alaska employers, mark your calendars.  On January 1, 2017, Alaska’s minimum wage will increase from $9.75 per hour to $9.80 per hour.

Under the Alaska minimum wage law, the Alaska minimum wage must be adjusted on an annual to account for inflation.  This adjustment is made using the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the proceeding January-December calendar year.

During the one-year period from January 2015 through December 2015, there was a 0.5% increase in the CPI, which, under Alaska law, causes Alaska’s minimum wage to increase by $0.05.

The Alaska Division of Labor Standards and Safety has published the new 2017 minimum wage poster, which is available here.

DOL Partnership regarding worker misclassification — 34 States and Counting

Thirty-five states have agreed to “team up” with the US Department of Labor to investigate worker misclassification. Is your state one of them?

In 2015, Department of Labor launched an initiative to combat the misclassification of employees as independent contractors. As a part of this initiative, the Department of Labor sought to partner with the state agencies and agree to share information and conduct joint investigations regarding independent contractor misclassification. To date, 35 states have entered into a memorandum of understanding regarding worker misclassification issues.

These states are:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Iowa
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Dakota
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

What does this mean for employers in these states?

Employers in the above-listed states should expect collaborative efforts between their state agencies and the Department of Labor during a investigation into potential employee misclassification as the state and the Department of Labor will share information. This could lead to simultaneous, multi-agency investigations into worker classification. It is recommended that companies have qualified legal counsel review any existing independent contractor arrangements. In addition, before entering into an independent contractor relationship, speak with an HR Professional or qualified legal counsel to verify that the worker truly is an independent contractor.

Increases to State Minimum Wage in 2016 – Is Your Company Affected?

With the start of 2016 just over two months away, employers in several states must begin preparing for the increase to minimum wage that will accompany the ringing in of the New Year.   Check the list below to see if minimum wage is increasing in your state …

Increase effective December 31, 2015

  • New York — Minimum wage increases to $9.00 per hour
  • West Virginia — Minimum wage increases to $8.75 per hour

Increase effective January 1, 2016

  • Alaska — Minimum wage increases to $9.75 per hour
  • Arkansas — Minimum wage increases to $8.00 per hour
  • California — Minimum wage increases to $10.00 per hour
  • Connecticut — Minimum wage increases to $9.60 per hour
  • Massachusetts — Minimum wage increases to $10.00 per hour ($3.35 per hour for tipped employees)
  • Michigan — Minimum wage increases to $8.50 per hour
  • Nebraska — Minimum wage increases to $9.00 per hour
  • Vermont — Minimum wage increases to $9.60 per hour

 

 

 

 

Alaska – New Minimum Wage

Alaska’s minimum wage will increase from $7.75 an hour to $8.75 on Jan. 1, 2015,  and to $9.75 on Jan. 1, 2016.  The measure also provides for automatic yearly increases after 2016 based upon inflation, and further provides for an automatic increase should their minimum wage ever be less than $1 over the federal minimum wage.  The measure included language that specifically indicated that tips and gratuities do not count towards a worker’s wage.