Tag Archives: Maine

Is The Minimum Required Salary For Exempt Employees Increasing In Your State In 2019?

While the FLSA minimum salary requirements for “white collar” employees (executive, administrative, or professional employees) is not changing in 2019 (at least not until/unless the Department of Labor announces a new Overtime Rule), there are several states where the minimum salary requirements for exempt employees is increasing in 2019 (December 31, 2018 for New York employers).

These increases (i.e. in Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, New York, and Oregon) are occurring because the minimum exempt salary rates for these employees (as established under state law) are scheduled to increase in 2018 (December 31st for New York employers).

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the minimum salary requirements for white collar employees is as follows:

Payment Schedule Minimum Salary
Weekly $455
Bi-Weekly $910
Semi-Monthly $985.83
Monthly $1,971.66
Annual $23,660

The below table sets forth the changes to the minimum salary requirements for exempt employees in these states.  In those instances where the state minimum salary requirements are lower than the above-listed FLSA requirements, the higher salary threshold applies for employers who are subject to FLSA in order for employees to qualify for an exemption under the FLSA.

Alaska
Applicable Law: An individual employed in a bona fide executive, administrative, or professional capacity shall be compensated on a salary or fee basis at a rate of not less than two times the state minimum wage for the first 40 hours of employment each week, exclusive of board or lodging that is furnished by the individual’s employer. Alaska Stat. § 23.10.055(b).

 Since Alaska’s minimum wage is increasing to $9.89 per hour starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees is increasing as follows:

Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $787.20 $791.20
Bi-Weekly $1,574.40 $1,582.40
Semi-Monthly $1,705.60 $1,714.27
Monthly $3,411.20 $3,428.53
Annual $40,768 $41,142.40
California
Applicable Law: Overtime-exempt executive, administrative and professional employees must earn a monthly salary equivalent to at least two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment. IWC Wage Orders.

 Since California’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.00 per hour (for employers with 25 or less employees) and $12.00 per hour (for employers with 26 or more employees) starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees is increasing as follows:

Small Employers (25 or less employees)
Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $840 $880
Bi-Weekly $1,680 $1,760
Semi-Monthly $1,820 $1,906.67
Monthly $3,640 $3, 813.34
Annual $43,680 $45,760
Large Employers (26 or more employees)
Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $880 $960
Bi-Weekly $1,760 $1,920
Semi-Monthly $1,906.67 $2,080
Monthly $3,813.34 $4,160
Annual $45,760 $49,920
Colorado**
Applicable Law: Exempt executive/supervisory employees must be a salaried employee earning in excess of the equivalent of the minimum wage for all hours the employee worked in a workweek. Colorado Minimum Wage Order.

Note: The administrative and professional exemptions only require that an employee be a “salaried individual” and does not provide a minimum salary requirement.

 Since Colorado’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.10 per hour starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt executive/supervisory employees is increasing as follows:

Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary* 2019 Minimum Salary*
Weekly $408 $444
Bi-Weekly $816 $888
Semi-Monthly $884 $962
Monthly $1,768 $1,924
Annual $21,216 $23,088
* These numbers are based on the employee working 40 hours per week.  If the employee works more than 40 hours per week, the required pay will be greater.
** In order for an executive employee to meet the minimum salary requirement under the FLSA, the employee will need to be paid the FLSA minimum salary.  However, once that employee works over 41 hours in a week, the state minimum wage salary requirement will apply.
Maine
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is 3,000 times the Maine minimum hourly wage or the minimum salary required by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, whichever is higher. 26 M.R.S 663(3)(K).

 Currently, the state threshold is higher than the FLSA threshold; therefore, the state threshold applies.

Since Maine’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.00 per hour starting January 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees is increasing as follows:

Payment Schedule 2018 Minimum Salary 2019 Minimum Salary
Weekly $576.92 $634.61
Bi-Weekly $1,153.84 $1, 269.23
Semi-Monthly $1,250 $1,375
Monthly $2,500 $2,750
Annual $30,000 $33,000
New York – INCREASES 12/31/2018
Applicable Law: Exempt executive and administrative employees must be paid at least the minimum salary set forth in the applicable New York Wage Orders.

 Note: There is no salary basis test for professional employees under New York law.

Under the amendments to the New York Wage Orders, the minimum salary for exempt executive and administrative employees is increasing on December 31, 2018 as follows:

New York City (11 or More Employees)
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $975 $1,125
Bi-Weekly $1,950 $2,250
Semi-Monthly $2,112.50 $2,437.50
Monthly $4,225 $4,875
Annual $50,700 $58,500
New York City (10 or Fewer Employees)
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $900 $1,012.50
Bi-Weekly $1,800 $2,025
Semi-Monthly $1,950 $2,193.75
Monthly $3,900 $4,387.50
Annual $46,800 $52,650
Nassau, Suffolk & Westchester Counties
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $825 $900
Bi-Weekly $1,650 $1,800
Semi-Monthly $1,787.50 $1,950
Monthly $3,575 $3,900
Annual $42,900 $46,800
Remainder of State
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 12/31/18
Weekly $780 $832
Bi-Weekly $1,560 $1,664
Semi-Monthly $1,690 $1,802.67
Monthly $3,380 $3,605.34
Annual $40,560 $43,264
Oregon*  – INCREASES 7/1/2019
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is the applicable minimum wage multiplied by 2,080 hours per year and then divided by 12 months. Or. Rev. Stat. § 653.010(9).

 Since Oregon’s minimum wage is increasing to $11.00 per hour (for employers in “nonurban counties”), $12.50 per hour (for employers in the Portland metropolitan area), and $11.25 per hour (for the remainder of the state) starting July 1, 2019, the minimum salary for exempt employees will be increasing as follows:

Nonurban Counties (Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, and Wheeler counties)
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 7/1/19
Weekly $420 $440
Bi-Weekly $840 $880
Semi-Monthly $910 $953.34
Monthly $1,820 $1,906.67
Annual $21,840 $22,880
Portland Metropolitan Area
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 7/1/19
Weekly $450 $500
Bi-Weekly $900 $1,000
Semi-Monthly $975 $1, 083.34
Monthly $1,950 $2, 166.67
Annual $23,400 $26,000
Remainder of the State
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary Minimum Salary On 7/1/19
Weekly $430 $450
Bi-Weekly $860 $900
Semi-Monthly $931.67 $975
Monthly $1,863.33 $1,950
Annual $22,360 $23,400
NOTE:  Currently, only employers in the Portland metropolitan area must pay the state salary in order for to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption.  All other employers in Oregon must pay the FLSA minimum salary in order for to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption.

While not increasing, the minimum salary requirements to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is higher than the FLSA threshold in the following states:

Connecticut
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify for an executive, professional or administrative exemption is $475 per week. Regs., Conn. State Agencies § 31-60-14.
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary
Weekly $475
Bi-Weekly $950
Semi-Monthly $1,029.17
Monthly $2,058.33
Annual $24,700
Iowa
Applicable Law: The minimum salary requirement to qualify as a “high-salaried” executive, professional or administrative employee (and qualify for an exemption from overtime if the duties test is also met) is $500 per week. 875 Iowa Admin. Code 218.1-218.3.
Payment Schedule Current Minimum Salary
Weekly $500
Bi-Weekly $1,000
Semi-Monthly $1,083.34
Monthly $2,166.67
Annual $26,000

Recommendation for Employers

It is recommended that employers in these states verify that their exempt employees are receiving at least the minimum salary requirement to qualify for the exemption.

Also, please remember that meeting the salary requirement is just one element needed to qualify for an exemption from overtime.  The employee in question must also meet the duties test and the salary basis test.

Check to See if the Minimum Required Salary For Exempt Employees is Increasing In Your State

While the minimum salary requirements for “white collar” employees (executive, administrative, or professional employees) is not changing in 2018 (at least not until/unless the Department of Labor announces a new Overtime Rule), there are several states where the minimum salary requirements for exempt employees is increasing in 2018 (December 31st for New York employers).

These increases (i.e. in Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, New York, and Oregon) are occurring because the minimum exempt salary rates for these employees (as established under state law) are scheduled to increase in 2018 (December 31st for New York employers).

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the minimum salary requirements for white collar employees is as follows:

Payment Schedule Minimum Salary
Weekly $455
Bi-Weekly $910
Semi-Monthly $985.83
Monthly $1,971.66
Annual $23,660

Continue reading Check to See if the Minimum Required Salary For Exempt Employees is Increasing In Your State

2018 MINIMUM WAGE CHECK-UP

With various cities and counties having enacted local minimum wages and 18 states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York*, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington) are increasing their own minimum wages on January 1st (December 31st for New York), employers should take time to verify that they are meeting the minimum wage requirements of their state/city/county.

The below chart sets forth the minimum wage effective January 1, 2018.

employer PAYS $1.50/hr towards medical benefits$11.91

Federal $7.25
State City/County  Amount?
Alabama  $7.25
Alaska*  $9.84
Arizona* — all cities/counties except …  $10.50
Flagstaff* $11.00
Arkansas  $8.50
California* — all cities/counties except …                                  small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $11.00
Berkeley  $13.75
Cupertino* $13.50
El Cerrito*  $13.60
Emeryville                                           small employer (55 or less) $14.00
large employer (56 or more) $15.20
Los Altos* $13.50
Los Angeles                                         small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Malibu                                                  small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Milpitas* $12.00
Mountain View* $15.00
Oakland $12.86
Palo Alto* $13.50
Pasadena                                             small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Richmond*                                             employer does NOT pay $1.50/hr towards medical benefits $13.41
employer PAYS $1.50/hr towards medical benefits $11.91
Sacramento*                                      small employer (100 or less) $10.50
large employer (101 or more) $11.00
San Diego $11.50
San Francisco $14.00
San Jose* $13.50
San Leandro $13.00
San Mateo*                                                 For-profit organizations $13.50
Non-profit organizations $12.00
Santa Clara* $13.00
Santa Monica                                       small employer (25 or less) $10.50
large employer (26 or more) $12.00
Sunnyvale* $15.00
Los Angeles County                            small employer (25 or less)

unincorporated areas                            large employer (26 or more)

$10.50

$12.00

Colorado* $10.20
Connecticut $10.10
Delaware $8.25
Florida* $8.25
Georgia $7.25
Hawaii* $10.10
Idaho $7.25
Illinois — all cities/counties except … $8.25
Chicago $11.00
Cook County

(except for the Village of Barrington)

$10.00
Indiana $7.25
Iowa $7.25
Kansas $7.25
Kentucky $7.25
Louisiana $7.25
Maine* — all cities/counties except … $10.00
Portland $10.68
Maryland — all cities/counties except … $9.25
Montgomery County $11.50
Prince George’s County $11.50
Massachusetts $11.00
Michigan* $9.25
Minnesota* — all cities/counties except … “small employers” (employers with an annual sales volume of less than $500,000) $7.87
“large employers” (employers with an annual sales volume of $500,000+) $9.65
Minneapolis                                         large employer (101 or more) $10.00
Mississippi $7.25
Missouri $7.85
Montana* $8.30
Nebraska $9.00
Nevada $8.25
New Hampshire $7.25
New Jersey* $8.60
New Mexico — all cities/counties except … $7.50
Albuquerque*                                             employer provides benefits $7.95
employer does NOT provide benefits $8.95
Las Cruces* $9.45
Santa Fe $11.09
Bernalillo County*unincorporated areas                                             employer provides benefits $7.85
employer does NOT provide benefits $8.85
Santa Fe County unincorporated areas $11.09
New York**  “Upstate” employers (excluding fast food employees) $10.40
“Downstate” employers (excluding fast food employees) $11.00
“Small” NYC employers (excluding fast food employees $12.00
Fast food employees outside NYC $11.75
“Large” NYC employers (excluding fast food employees) $13.00
Fast food employees inside NYC $13.50
North Carolina $7.25
North Dakota $7.25
Ohio* $8.30
Oklahoma $7.25
Oregon — all cities/counties except … $10.25
Portland $11.25
Nonurban Counties 

(Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klmath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa Wheeler counties)

$10.00
Pennsylvania $7.25
Rhode Island* $10.10
South Carolina $7.25
South Dakota* $8.85
Tennessee $7.25
Texas $7.25
Utah $7.25
Vermont* $10.50
Virginia $7.25
Washington* — all cities/counties except … $11.50
City of SeaTac* (hospitality and transportation workers) $15.64
Seattle* $14.00
small employer who does not pay towards medical benefits

(500 or less)

small employer who does pay towards medical benefits

(500 or less)

$11.50
large employer who does not pay towards medical benefits

(501 or more)

$15.00
large employer who does pay towards medical benefits

(501 or more)

$15.45
Tacoma* $12.00
Washington DC $12.50
West Virginia $8.75
Wisconsin $7.25
Wyoming $7.25
 * = increase in minimum wage effective January 1, 2018

** = increase in minimum wage effective December 31, 2017

 

Caveat: Please be advised that this information is being provided as a courtesy and that ePlace Solutions, Inc. does not track local laws and ordinances and will not update this information with changes in local laws and ordinances.

 

 

NEW LAW – Maine Reinstates Tip Credit For Tipped Workers

In November of 2016, Maine voters passed a referendum that increased Maine’s minimum wage, but also eliminated the tip credit for tipped workers.  Recently, Maine Governor Paul LePage signed LD 673 into law.  This new law restores the tip credit for Maine businesses that employ servers and other workers who receive tips.

The new law does not take immediate effect.  Instead, the new law takes effect 90 days after the Legislature adjourns (August 2, 2017), which means that the law will take effect on Wednesday, November 1, 2017.

When the new law goes into effect, employers will once again be able to pay tipped employees half the state’s minimum wage.  However, employers will still be required to make up the difference in tipped employee pay when their weekly tips are not equal to what they would earn under the minimum wage.

High Times in Maine??? Not until February 2018

Maine was one of four states in which voters approved a new recreational marijuana law. Maine’s law took effect on January 30, 2017; however, emergency legislation, passed on January 27, 2017, postponed the enactment of certain provisions of the law.

Specifically, the emergency legislation:

  1. Clarified that possession of a usable amount of marijuana by a juvenile is a crime, unless the juvenile is authorized to possess medical marijuana; and,
  2. Delayed the effective date of most of the provisions of the law including the anti-discrimination provisions, until February 1, 2018, so that the state licensing authority can establish and implement regulations concerning retail sales of marijuana;
  3. Prohibits possession of any edible retail marijuana products until February 1, 2018.

Take Home for Employers

Maine employers should actively engage in assessing and evaluating employment law compliance approaches and requirements under Maine’s medical marijuana statute, which the emergency legislation (LD88) did not affect.

Additionally, when the recreational marijuana law becomes effective (on February 1, 2018), Maine will be the first state to offer employment law protections to employees who use recreational marijuana outside of work.  If this takes place, the anti-discrimination provisions of the Maine recreational marijuana law will have to be aligned with the provision allowing employers to discipline employees who are “under the influence of marijuana in the workplace” which facilities a lower wrongdoing and proof standard than “impairment”.

This emergency legislation in Maine will make it difficult for employers to conduct drug testing for marijuana, particularly in the pre-employment context.  This is because even if employee is suspected of being “under the influence of marijuana in the workplace,” the drug test result cannot provide conclusive proof that the marijuana was consumed at work.

We recommend that employers review their employee handbooks and ensure their policies match and consider drug testing policies and how the new law will impact their organization in 2018 to avoid legal issues.

 

Now that recreational marijuana is legal — Maine employers be ware!

As reported in an earlier article (“Impact of Maine’s New Recreational Marijuana Law on Employers“), Maine voters approved a law (the “Marijuana Legalization Act“) that decriminalizes recreational marijuana use in the state of Maine in the 2016 election.  This law went into effect on January 30, 2017.

Under this law, persons age 21 or over are permitted to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana for personal use and to keep and cultivate up to six adult marijuana plants.

While the law allows Maine employers to implement and enforce policies governing marijuana use, possession, transport or employees being under the influence of marijuana in the workplace, the law also includes a unique and less employer-friendly provision.

Under the new law, employers are prohibited from discriminating against an employee or an applicant because of that individual’s use of recreational marijuana outside of work.  In other words, employers are prohibited from refusing to employ or otherwise penalizing persons 21 years of age or older solely because the person uses marijuana recreationally outside the employer’s property.

In light of this provision, it is recommended that employers proceed with caution when disciplining or otherwise making personnel-related decisions affecting employees who the employer knows use marijuana recreationally in order to avoid a claim that the employer’s action was motivated by the employee’s marijuana use rather than a legitimate business purpose.

Maine Employers Be Ware — The Minimum Salary for Maine’s “White Collar” Overtime Exemptions Has Increased

At the start of the year, Maine’s minimum wage increased to $9 per hour.  However, that was not the only change to Maine’s wage and hour requirements.

The minimum salary required for the white collar overtime exemptions has also increased.  Under Maine law, the minimum salary required for Maine’s “white collar” overtime exemptions must exceed either 3,000 times the Maine minimum wage or the minimum salary required under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, whichever is greater.

Since the DOL Overtime Rule was enjoined, the increase in Maine’s minimum wage also triggers an increase of the minimum salary required for the white collar overtime exemptions from $22,500 to $27,000 per year.

The Maine Department of Labor has updated the required poster to reflect these changes.

It is recommended that all Maine employers update their Minimum Wage Poster and verify that their exempt employees’ salaries meet the new minimum salary requirements.

2017 Minimum Wage Increases — Cities and Counties

In an earlier article (“State Minimum Wage Increases for 2017“), we provided a breakdown of the increases to State minimum wage that are going into effect on January 1, 2017 (December 31, 2016 for New York).

In addition to these minimum wage increases, several cities (and some counties) have their own “local minimum wages” which are also increasing in the new year.

Minimum Wage as of November 21, 2016 Scheduled Increase for January 1, 2017
Arizona Cities
Flagstaff $8.05 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
California Cities/Counties
County of Los Angeles $10.00 No increase 1/1/17         To increase 7/1/17 — $10.50
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (26 or more) $10.50 No increase 1/1/17         To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
County/City of San Francisco $13.00 No increase 1/1/17 To increase 7/1/17 — $14.00
Berkeley Alameda County $12.53 No increase 1/1/17 To increase 10/1/17 — $13.75
Cupertino Santa Clara County $10.00 $12.00
El Cerrito Contra Costa County $11.60 $12.25
Emeryville Alameda County $13.00 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $14.00
small employer (55 or less)
large employer (56 or more) $14.82 No increase 1/1/17      May increase 7/1/17 based on CPI
Long Beach LA County $10.00 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $10.50
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (26 or more) $10.50 No increase 1/1/17 To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
Los Altos Santa Clara County $10.00 $12.00
Los Angeles LA County $10.00 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $10.50
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (26 or more) $10.50 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
Mailbu Los Angeles County $10.00 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $10.50
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (26 or more) $10.50 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
Mountain View Santa Clara County $11.00 $13.00
Oakland Alameda County $12.55 No increase 1/1/17
Palo Alto Santa Clara County $11.00 No increase 1/1/17
Pasadena LA County $10.00 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $10.50
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (26 or more) $10.50 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
Richmond Contra Costa County $11.52 $12.30
San Diego San Diego County $10.50 $11.50
San Jose Santa Clara County $10.30 No increase 1/1/17
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (101 or more) $10.30 $10.50
San Leandro Alameda County $10.00 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
San Mateo San Mateo County $10.00 $12.00
For profit companies
small Non profit companies (25 or less) $10.00 No increase 1/1/17
large Non profit companies (26 or more $10.00 $10.50
Santa Clara Santa Clara County $11.00 No increase 1/1/17
Santa Monica LA County $10.00 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $10.50
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (26 or more) $10.50 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $12.00
Sacramento Sacramento County $10.00 No increase 1/1/17         To increase 1/1/18 — $10.50
small employer (25 or less)
large employer (26 or more) $10.00 $10.50
Sunnyvale Santa Clara County $11.00 $13.00
Illinois Cities/Counties
Cook County $8.25 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $10.00
Chicago $10.50 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $11.00
Iowa Counties
Johnson County $9.15 $10.10
Linn County $7.25 $8.25
Polk County $7.25 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 4/1/17 — $8.75
Wapello County $7.25 $8.20
Maine Cities
Bangor $7.50 $9.00
Portland $10.10 $10.68
Maryland Counties
Montgomery County $10.75 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 10/1/17 — $11.50
Prince George’s County $10.75 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 10/1/17 — $11.50
New Mexico Cities/Counties
Bernalillo County $8.65 No increase 1/1/17
Santa Fe County $10.91 No increase 1/1/17
Albuquerque $8.75 No increase 1/1/17
Las Cruces $8.40 $9.20
Santa Fe $10.91 No increase 1/1/17
New York Cities/Counties
“Upstate” employers (excluding fast food employers) $9.00 for all employees but fast food employees $9.70
“Upstate” Fast Food employers $9.75 for fast food employees only $10.75
“Downstate” employers (excluding fast food employers) $9.00 for all employees but fast food employees $10.00
“Downstate” Fast Food employers $9.75 for fast food employees only $10.75
New York City “small” employers (excluding fast food employers) $9.00 for all employees but fast food employees $10.50
New York City “large” employers (excluding fast food employers) $9.00 for all employees but fast food employees $11.00
New York City Fast Food employers $9.75 for fast food employees only $12.00
~ “Upstate” = employers in all counties “upstate” from the greater NYC area              ~ “Downstate” = employers in Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester Counties                    ~ “Small” NYC employers = employers with 10 or fewer employees                            ~ “Large” NYC employers = employers with 11 or more employees
Oregon Cities/Counties
Nonurban Counties
(Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa Wheeler counties)
$9.50 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $10.00
Portland $9.75 No increase 1/1/17        To increase 7/1/17 — $11.25
Washington Cities
City of SeaTac (hospitality and transportation workers) $15.00 No increase 1/1/17
Seattle
small employer (500 or less) $12.00 $13.00
large employer (501 or more) $13.00 $15.00
Tacoma $10.35 $11.15

Recommendation for Employers

It is recommended that employers in the above-listed cities/counties prepare for these minimum wage increases.  In addition, if your city/county is not listed on this chart, we recommend that you check with your local Chamber of Commerce to determine the minimum wage in your city.

Caveat: Please be advised that this information is being provided as a courtesy and that ePlace Solutions, Inc. does not track local laws and ordinances and will not update this information with changes in local laws and ordinances.

Impact of Maine’s New Recreational Marijuana Law on Employers

The Marijuana Legalization Act is the newly passed recreational marijuana law in Maine, which was approved by voters in the 2016 election. This law decriminalizes recreational marijuana use in the state of Maine.

The law legalizes the non-medical use up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and to possess, grow, cultivate, process, or transport up to six marijuana plants for those 21 and older. In addition, marijuana retail will be able to sell marijuana once the state rulemaking process is completed.

The portion of the new law relating to marijuana use and possession goes into effect 30 days after Maine’s governor signs the ballot measure (which must occur within 10 days of the announcement of the official results – November 11, 2016).

The impact on employers?

The new law does not change an employer’s ability to have policies prohibiting the use of marijuana by employee and applicants. The new law also does not require employers to permit or accommodate the use of marijuana in the workplace, or prevent employers from complying with state or federal law.

As a result, Maine employers are still permitted to prohibit employees from smoking pot in the workplace and/or from coming to work under the influence of marijuana. In addition, pre-employment drug testing and reasonable suspicion drug testing for marijuana use remain lawful. However, employers should remember that current drug tests only flag whether THC (the active ingredient in marijuana) is present in the individual’s system and does not determine the level of a tested individual’s impairment. This means that an individual can test positive for marijuana without being “high.” It is recommended that employers train frontline supervisors and managers will need to be more vigilant about documenting independent indications of impairment in the workplace such as unusual sleepiness, slowed perception and motor skills, and red eyes.

2016 Election Aftermath – Minimum wage to increase in Arizona, Colorado, Maine, and Washington

Following the 2016 election, voters in Arizona, Colorado, Maine, and Washington approved ballot measures to increase minimum wage in these states starting January 1, 2017.

Minimum wage will increase in these four states in accordance with the following schedule:

Arizona

  • January 1, 2017 — $10.00
  • January 1, 2018 — $10.50
  • January 1, 2019 — $11.00
  • January 1, 2020 — $12.00
  • January 1, 2021 – minimum wage will adjust for inflation

Colorado

  • January 1, 2017 — $9.30
  • January 1, 2018 — $10.20
  • January 1, 2019 — $11.10
  • January 1, 2020 — $12.00
  • January 1, 2021 – minimum wage will adjust for inflation

Maine

  • January 1, 2017 — $9.00
  • January 1, 2018 — $10.00
  • January 1, 2019 — $11.00
  • January 1, 2020 — $12.00
  • January 1, 2021 – minimum wage will adjust for inflation

Washington

  • January 1, 2017 — $11.00
  • January 1, 2018 — $11.50
  • January 1, 2019 — $12.00
  • January 1, 2020 — $13.50
  • January 1, 2021 – minimum wage will adjust for inflation

It is recommended that employers in these states prepare for these minimum wage increases.