Tag Archives: Race

2017 EEOC Litigation Data Released

The EEOC recently released the national enforcement data for the 2017 fiscal year.  According to this report, the total number of EEOC charges received in 2017 decreased from 91,503 received in 2016 to 84,254 received in 2017.

In addition, according to the report, in 2017, the EEOC resolved 99,109 charges and secured more than $398 million for victims of discrimination in private, federal and state and local government workplaces.  Most notably, the EEOC received 6,696 sexual harassment charges and 1,762 LGBT-based sexual discrimination charges and obtained $46.3 million and $16.1 million in monetary benefits respectively for resolving these charges.

Retaliation claims remain the most popular claims filed. Race claims, Disability claims, Sex/Gender claims and Age discrimination charges round out the top five.  The total breakdown of charges by type is as follows:

Retaliation 41,097 48.8%
Race 28,528 33.9%
Disability 26,838 31.9%
Sex/Gender 25,605 30.4%
Age 18,376 21.8%
National Origin 8,299 9.8%
Religion 3,436 4.1%
Color 3,240 3.8%
Equal Pay Act 996 1.2%
Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act 206 0.2%

In addition, the EEOC has also released the breakdown of claims received by state.  The top 10 states are:

   Type of Charge
Total Charges Retaliation Race Disability Sex/Gender Age
Texas 8,827 4,740 2,999 2,642 2,740 1,975
Florida 6,858 3,486 2,153 2,222 2,041 1,366
California 5,423 2,752 1,811 1,915 1,500 1,374
Georgia 4,894 2,434 1,864 1,362 1,596 807
Pennsylvania 4,516 2,133 1,195 1,647 1,293 1,118
Illinois 4,392 2,382 1,663 1,414 1,399 1,032
North Carolina 3,752 1,854 1,447 1,210 1,034 751
New York 3,690 1,711 1,095 1,052 1,142 858
Virginia 2,730 1,201 966 864 818 518
Tennessee 2,640 1,318 970 808 815 528

The full state breakdown of claims is available here.

NEW LAW – Birmingham City Council Passes Nondiscrimination Ordinance

On September 26, 2017, the Birmingham City Council passed a new nondiscrimination ordinance, which is the first of its kind in Alabama.

Under this new law, the City of Birmingham has prohibited discrimination on the basis of a person’s real or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or familial status.

This new law applies to housing, public accommodations, public education, and employment. There are only two exceptions for compliance — one for religious corporations and one for employers with bona fide affirmative action plans or seniority systems.

In addition, the new law creates a Human Rights Commission that will advise the Mayor and Council on matters related to eliminating discriminatory practices within the City.

The ordinance still needs to be signed into law by the mayor, in order for it to become effective.  However, the mayor has indicated that he will sign it into law immediately.

2016 EEOC Litigation Data Released

The EEOC recently released the national enforcement data for the 2016 fiscal year.  According to this report, the total number of EEOC charges received in 2015 increased from 89,385 received in 2015 to 91,503 received in 2016.

In addition, according to the report, in 2016, the EEOC resolved 97,443 charges and secured more than $482 million for victims of discrimination in private, federal and state and local government workplaces.

Retaliation claims remain the most popular claims filed. Race claims, Disability claims, Sex/Gender claims and Age discrimination charges round out the top five.  The total breakdown of charges by type is as follows:

Retaliation
42,018 45.9%
Race  32,309 35.3%
Disability 28,073 30.7%
Sex/Gender 26,934 29.4%
Age 20,857 22.8%
National Origin 9,840 10.8%
Religion 3,825 4.2%
Color 3,102 3.4%
Equal Pay Act 1,075 1.2%
Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act 238 0.3%

In addition, the EEOC has also released the breakdown of claims received by state.  The top 10 states are:

Type of Charge
Total Charges Retaliation Race Disability Sex/Gender Age
Texas 9,308 4,633 3,244 2,775 2,765 2,000
Florida 7,610 3,530 2,285 2,221 2,332 1,661
California 5,870 2,937 1,905 1,912 1,560 1,517
Georgia 5,273 2,577 2,165 1,462 1,684 1,028
Illinois 5,072 2,327 2,255 1,466 1,325 1,633
Pennsylvania 4,564 1,964 1,228 1,646 1,255 1,198
North Carolina 4,372 2,077 1,705 1,384 1,265 885
New York 3,740 1,604 1,084 1,061 1,202 865
Alabama 3,371 1,211 1,865 647 934 503
Virginia 2,945 1,242 1,069 921 881 583

The full state breakdown of claims is available here.

The Meaning of Harassment, Forever Changed?

Last week the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal shocked employers when the court held that two racial slurs made within 24 hours, may create a hostile work environment.  The court in, Boyer-Liberto v. Fountainbleau Corp., No. 13-1473 (4th Cir. May 7, 2015), held that a single instance of harassment may create an actionable hostile work environment claim.   Additionally, the court found that an employee can be protected from retaliation when complaining about harassment, even if the purported harassment is ultimately not severe enough to create a hostile work environment.

Facts

Plaintiff, an African-American female, was a waitress.  Over a 24 hour time-period, a manager made two extremely offensive racial slurs directly to plaintiff.  The employer argued that these two instances were not enough for plaintiff to believe that she had been subjected to a hostile work environment.  The court disagreed and the case will be allowed to proceed on her harassment claim.

Likewise, the Court found that  “an employee is protected from retaliation when she reports an isolated incident of harassment that is physically threatening or humiliating, even if a hostile work environment is not engendered by that incident alone.”

 

 

EEOC Alleges Racial Harassment and Retaliation

On January 9, 2015, the EEOC filed a lawsuit against DHD Ventures in South Carolina, alleging that the company had subjected two black employees to hostile work environment.  According to the EEOC, the employees’ co-workers used racial slurs on a regular basis.  The two employees had complained on multiple occasions but the harassment continued.  The EEOC alleges that the employees were terminated for making the complaints.